All Gambling Terms Dictionary

 G 
Gg [Greyhound Racing]
Gulf Greyhound Park
  
Gi [Martial Arts]
The uniform worn while practicing martial arts.
  
Gi-Ghet [Archery]
A bow string, Sabanus of Mindanae.
  
Giant [Gymnastics]
A swing on the horizontal bar in which the fully-extended body rotates 360 degrees around the bar.
  
Giant Slalom [Skiing]
A type of race similar to the slalom, but with fewer and wider turns that require the skier to spend a lot of time going across the hill rather than down it. Each skier makes two runs, on two different courses, and the fastest cumulative time determines the winner.
  
Gidp [Baseball]
Grounded Into Double Plays
  
Gienger [Gymnastics]
A flyaway with a one-half twist, followed by a re-grasp of the bar. Named for German gymnast Eberhard Gienger, who created it.
  
Gietdaugie [Archery]
A Laplanders bow.
  
Gig [Horse Racing]
See sulky.
  
Gilmer Belt [Motor Sports]
Toothed or splined drive belt used with matching pulley, generally a non-slip drive belt.
  
Gilroy [Poker]
Three 10s, from the phrase San Jose to Gilroy. Also, from here to Gilroy.
  
Gimbals [Sailing]
Hinges for objects such as lamps, compasses and stoves so that they can remain upright as the boat rolls.
  
Gimme [Golf]
A putt that is certain to be made on the next shot and will most likely be conceded by an opponent.
  
Gimmick [Wrestling]
(noun) A persona that a wrestler is given to make him interesting. While gimmicks have always been a part of pro wrestling, from the mid-80s to the early-90s, gimmicks ruled. The WWF was often referred to as a "circus" during that time because of the number of cartoon-like gimmicks that their wrestlers were given. At a given time you could turn on a WWF show and see clowns, evil dentists, race car drivers, garbage men, plumbers and more. It is largely due to this overkill that gimmicks have been drastically toned down in the past few years.
  
Gimmick Bets [Horse Racing]
A slang term, referring to exotic bets, that is, any bets other than straight win, place and show bets. The term comes from the philosophy that it's tough enough to pick one horse, let alone more than one.
  
Gimpy [Horse Racing]
This term describes a horse that is slightly lame.
  
Gin [Poker]
In lowball, when a player says "Gin!" it means he has a wheel (A-2-3-4-5).
  
Girl [Poker]
Queen (the card). Also, lady, mop squeezer
  
Girlfriend/Boyfriend [Skydiving]
Forget it. You won't have the time anyway.
  
Girth [Horse Racing]
An elastic and leather band, sometimes covered with sheepskin, that passes under a horse's belly and is connected to both sides of the saddle.
  
Git-go [Poker]
Start; usually preceded by from the. "He had four girls right from the git-go."
  
Give a Card [Poker]
Permit a free ride, that is, in stud poker or hold 'em, not bet on a particular round, so that opponents can get another card without having to call a bet.
  
Give Action [Poker]
Betting, calling, raising or re-raising.
  
Give Air [Poker]
Inadvertently exposing cards; usually part of the phrase put air into [a hand]. "You'll like sitting next to Johnny; he puts a lot of air into his hand." That is, if you sit next to Johnny, the way he holds his cards you can often see some of them, which, presumably, gives you an edge (albeit an unethical one) on him.
  
Give Away [Poker]
Revealing one's hand by obvious play.
  
Give Someone a Card [Poker]
Let an opponent have a free card (A card that a player gets without having to call a bet. ).
  
Give Way Vessel [Sailing]
The vessel that must yield to another vessel according to the navigation rules. Also known as the burdened vessel.
  
Give-and-go [Basketball]
A fundamental play in which one player passes to a teammate, then cuts to the basket to receive a return pass for an open layup or dunk.
  
Given Notice [Wrestling]
When a wrestler informs the federation that he works for that he's leaving.
  
Gl [Greyhound Racing]
Geneva Lakes
  
Gland Martingale (System) [Roulette]
Tongue in cheek name for a limited Martingale System of two steps after a predetermined number of even-money decisions has occurred. Not to be confused with Grand Martingale.
  
Glanz Wach (Wax) [Golf]
Compound used along with a buffing wheel to create a high luster finish on a polyurethane coated wood or metal wood.
  
Glass [Ice Hockey]
The plexiglas sheet on top of the boards, which protects spectators and players on the bench from the puck.
  
Glass-Work [Poker]
Use by a cheating dealer of a mirror or other reflective device (such as a shiner) to read the faces of the cards while they are being dealt face down.
  
Glazed Card [Poker]
A card that has been sanded slightly, to allow a cheating dealer to find it among the others card.
  
Glcw [Wrestling]
Great Lakes Championship Wrestling
  
Gleamer [Poker]
A cheating device, a mirror or other shiny object, such as a highly-polished cigarette lighter, placed apparently innocently on the table, used to read the reflected faces of the cards while they are being dealt. Also, gaper, shiner, reflector
  
Glide [Fencing]
To make a moderate forward movement while maintaining contact with the opponent's blade.
  
Glide Ratio [Skydiving]
The distance a canopy flies forward compared to down. A canopy with a 3:1 glide ratio flies three feet forward for every foot of vertical descent.
  
Glide Wax [Skiing]
A wax that decreases the friction between the skis and the snow, which is applied to the entire ski for freestyle races, but only to the tails and tips for classical races. Compare grip wax.
  
Glide Waxes [Skiing]
A paraffin wax applied to the running surface of the skis to enhance glide. See also skating wax.
  
Glim Worker [Poker]
A cheater who uses glass-work (Use by a cheating dealer of a mirror or other reflective device (such as a shiner) to read the faces of the cards while they are being dealt face down).
  
Glimmer [Poker]
A cheating device, a mirror or other shiny object, such as a highly-polished cigarette lighter, placed apparently innocently on the table, used to read the reflected faces of the cards while they are being dealt. Also, gaper, shiner, reflector
  
Global Positioning System [Sailing]
GPS for short. A system of satellites that allows one's position to be calculated with great accuracy by the use of an electronic receiver.
  
Globe [Sailing]
A map of the earth drawn on a sphere so that both its distances and angles are accurate.
  
Glove Hand [Ice Hockey]
The hand on which the goaltender wears the catching glove.
  
Glove Save [Ice Hockey]
A save made with the catching glove.
  
Glove Side [Ice Hockey]
The side on which the goaltender wears the catching glove; the opposite of stick side.
  
Glscc [Motor Sports]
Great Lakes Sports Car Club
  
Glue [Poker]
A sticky substance a thief rubs on his palm to permit chips to stick to the palm without having to close his fingers around the chips. Also, check cop.
  
Gm [Greyhound Racing]
Green Mountain
  
Gmr [Motor Sports]
GingerMan Raceway, South Haven MI. 1.8 mile road racing course.
  
Gmt [Sailing]
Time measured in Greenwich Mean Time. Coordinated universal time is a newer standard. A time standard that is not affected by time zones or seasons.
  
Gmw [Wrestling]
Green Mountain Wrestling
  
Gn [Blackjack]
The acronym for a Las Vegas casino called Golden Nugget.
  
Go [Poker]
The current betting level (amount it takes to enter the pot), as in "$20 to go" meaning every player must contribute $20 (total) or drop. A $10 raise would then make the pot "$30 to go".
  
Go About [Sailing]
To tack.
  
Go All in [Poker]
To run out of chips while betting or calling. In table stakes games, a player may not go into his pocket for more money during a hand. If he runs out, a side pot is created in which he has no interest. However, he can still win the pot for which he had the chips. Example: "Poor Bob - he made quads against the big full house, but he was all-in on the second bet."
  
Go Both Ways [Poker]
In a high-low split game, use chips or voice to indicate you're going for both high and low simultaneously.
  
Go Cow [Poker]
Go half and half with a player on his buy-in to a game; usually preceded by go; sometimes followed by up. When the player quits, he splits with the person with whom he went cow. Sometimes the house goes cow with a player to enable him to get into a larger game than he could otherwise afford, generally with the no altruistic purpose of filling what would otherwise be a shaky game. At some point when the player (the house hopes) gets far enough ahead of the game, the house may split him out, that is, remove half of his chips and put him on his own.
  
Go for it [Poker]
1) Perform a cheating maneuver with the deck. If a bottom dealer goes for it, it means he is just in the process of dealing a bottom. 2) Draw to a hand. "What's it cost me? I'm going to go for it."
  
Go for the Bottom [Poker]
Deal a card from the bottom of the deck.
  
Go High [Greyhound Racing]
See 'Buy'.
  
Go Hog [Poker]
In a high-low split game, use chips or voice to indicate you're going for both high and low simultaneously. Also, hog it or just hog.
  
Go in [Poker]
1) Put money into a pot, thereby remaining eligible to win the pot. 2) To run out of chips while betting or calling. In table stakes games, a player may not go into his pocket for more money during a hand. If he runs out, a side pot is created in which he has no interest. However, he can still win the pot for which he had the chips. Example: "Poor Bob - he made quads against the big full house, but he was all-in on the second bet."
  
Go into the Country [Motor Sports]
To leave the track, in road racing.
  
Go Light [Poker]
In some home games, not played for table stakes, when a player does not have enough chips to continue betting in a pot, that player withdraws chips from the pot equal to the amount of the betting beyond his chips, (usually) stacking them neatly in front of him. These are called lights. To so withdraw chips is called go light.
  
Go Low [Greyhound Racing]
See 'Sell'.
  
Go no Sen [Martial Arts]
The initiative in the defense
  
Go on [Horse Racing]
When referring to a horse, to win at a new, longer distance.
  
Go South [Poker]
1) Remove chips surreptitiously from the table (so called because on a map that's the direction they go), or pocket winnings while playing. Also called rat hole. 2) Palm or otherwise surreptitiously remove cards from the deck for later introduction (by a thief) at an opportune moment. 3) Leave a game or card room with money obtained dishonestly. 4) Disappear. "I lent him $20 and he went south with it."
  
Go the Overs [Poker]
1) Over blinding (Put in a blind when one is already present. In a traveling blind game, this could mean someone putting in an optional blind in addition to the mandatory blinds. In a game without mandatory blinds, this would be blinding a pot (putting in a blind) after someone else has killed it. (To put in an over blind is sometimes called to kill.). 2) Playing at a higher limit than the house has set for the game, usually for the purpose of paying time to the house at the nominal rate for the game. For example, playing 8-limit stakes in a 6-limit game, or playing 4-8 in a 3-6 game. 3) Playing, among players who agree, at higher limits then those who don't have dropped.
  
Go Ti [Martial Arts]
An ancient form of Chinese wrestling.
  
Go to Bed with Bisques [Croquet]
To lose in a handicap game with one or more unused bisques.
  
Go to School [Golf]
To learn how a putt will break by watching another player's putt along approximately the same line.
  
Go to the Center [Poker]
To run out of chips while betting or calling. In table stakes games, a player may not go into his pocket for more money during a hand. If he runs out, a side pot is created in which he has no interest. However, he can still win the pot for which he had the chips. Example: "Poor Bob - he made quads against the big full house, but he went to the center on the second bet."
  
Go Uphill [Poker]
Defy the odds. Trying to beat a hand you know to be better than yours. In stud or hold 'em games, this means call another bet, with an inferior hand, to see one more card, and probably be willing to see subsequent cards if the next one doesn't help, or if the next one gives one a draw to a possible winner. In draw games, this means call a bet with the intention of drawing multiple cards trying to make a Gardena miracle or freak draw.
  
Go-Ahead Rbi [Baseball]
Any time a player drives in a run which gives his team the lead, he is credited with a go-ahead RBI.
  
Go/Ao [Baseball]
Ground Outs/ Fly Outs Ratio
  
Goal [Water Polo]
1) The water polo goal is made of two goal posts and a crossbar, from which a net is suspended. The goal posts are 3 meters apart and the crossbar is .9 meters above the water surface. 2) A score, which is made by throwing or dribbling the ball so that it goes completely across the goal line, between the posts and under the crossbar.
  
Goal Area [Soccer]
The rectangular area 20 yards wide by 6 yards deep in front of each goal from which all goal kicks are taken; inside this area, it is illegal for opposing players to charge a goalie not holding the ball.
  
Goal Cage [Ice Hockey]
The target for scorers, it's a tubular metal frame, 6 feet wide by 4 feet high, made up a crossbar and two goal posts, to which a net is attached. The goalposts rest on the goal line.
  
Goal Circle [Field Hockey]
Actually a D-shaped area made up of two quarter-circles, measured 16 yards out from each goal post and joined by a short straight line. An attacking player must be within this area to score. Also known as the "shooting circle" or "striking circle."
  
Goal Crease [Ice Hockey]
An area in front of the goal cage. In the National Hockey League, the crease is a rectangle 8 feet wide and 4 feet long, surmounted by the arc of a circle that extends a further 1 feet at its height. Attacking players are not allowed to interfere with the goaltender in the crease, although incidental contact is now allowed.
  
Goal Judge [Ice Hockey]
One of two officials who are responsible for determining whether the puck has passed between the goal posts and completely across the goal line, the two requirements for a legal goal. The judge sits in a cage behind the goal cage and turns on a red light to signify that a goal has been scored. However, the referee can overrule the goal judge.
  
Goal Kick [Soccer]
A type of restart where the ball is kicked from inside the goal area away from the goal; awarded to the defending team when a ball that crossed the goal line was last touched by a player on the attacking team.
  
Goal Light [Ice Hockey]
See red light.
  
Goal Line [Soccer]
The field boundary running along its width at each end; also called the end line; runs right across the front of the goal; the line which a ball must completely cross for a goal to be scored.
  
Goal Mouth [Ice Hockey]
The opening at the front of the goal cage formed by the goal posts and the crossbar, plus the ice area immediately in front of that opening.
  
Goal Post [Ice Hockey]
One of the two vertical metal bars that, with the crossbar, frame the goal cage.
  
Goal Posts [Rugby]
The posts located at the center of the goal line at each end of the field, 18 feet, 4 inches apart, connected by a cross-bar 9 feet, 10 inches above the ground.
  
Goal Throw [Water Polo]
A throw taken by the defending goalkeeper from behind the two-meter line to restart play if an attacking player was the last to touch the ball before it went out over the goal line.
  
Goalie [Ice Hockey]
The goaltender.
  
Goalkeeper [Water Polo]
Each team has a goalkeeper, who must remain behind the half-distance line. The goalkeeper alone is allowed to stand or walk on the floor of the pool, to jump from the floor of the pool, to use both hands on the ball, and to punch the ball.
  
Goalkeeper, Goalie or Goaltender [Ice Hockey]
The heavily padded player who guards the goal; prevents opponents from scoring by stopping the puck any way he can.
  
Goalmouth [Soccer]
The front opening to each goal.
  
Goalpost [Football]
A tall metallic structure that stands at the back of each end zone; consists of a crossbar and two uprights that extend upward from it, supported directly above the end line by a base; teams try to kick the ball above the crossbar and between the uprights to score a field goal or extra point.
  
Goalposts [Ice Hockey]
The metal bars that frame the area to which the net is attached which rests on the center of the goal line and between which a puck must pass to score a goal.
  
Goals against [Ice Hockey]
The total number of goals given up by a goaltender or a team within a given period of time.
  
Goals against Average [Ice Hockey]
The average number of goals given up per 60-minute game by a goaltender or a team within a given period of time. The average is computed by dividing goals against by minutes played and multiplying the result by 60.
  
Goaltender [Ice Hockey]
The defensive player normally stationed directly in front of the goal cage, whose primary job is to prevent goals by the other team. The goaltender wears special protective equipment and is given some special protection by the rules, while he is in the goal crease. If assessed a minor, major, or misconduct penalty, the goaltender remains in the game while another player goes to the penalty box in his stead.
  
Goaltending [Basketball]
Interfering with a shot while it is on its downward flight toward the basket, while it is on its upward flight toward the basket after having touched the backboard, or while it is in the cylinder above the rim. If committed by a defensive player, the shot counts. If committed by an offense player, it is a violation and the ball is awarded to the opposing team for a throw-in.
  
Goat's Foot, Hind's Foot, Pied De Biche [Archery]
A system of articulated levers used to span a crossbow.
  
Gobble [Golf]
An obsolete slang term meaning a hard-hit putt that holes out.
  
God of Lowball [Poker]
A mythical deity to whom lowball players supposedly pray for good hands, and who presumably protects those in his good graces; used humorously.
  
God of Poker Dictionary [Poker]
A mythical deity to whom poker players supposedly pray for good hands, and who presumably protects those in his (her?) good graces; used humorously.
  
Godle [Archery]
Buriat for arrow.
  
Goes Up Through the Gears [Motor Sports]
Refers to a driver upshifting from the lowest to the highest gear.
  
Goggles [Horse Racing]
Equipment worn by jockeys, over the eyes to protect them from flying material kicked up from horses in front of them. Jockeys can be found to wear several pairs of goggles in one race, disposing of them as their vision is impaired during the running of the race.
  
Gohon Kumite [Martial Arts]
Five steps sparring
  
Going [General]
The description of conditions underfoot on the racecourse. Official Jockey Club going reports progress as follows: Heavy - soft - good to soft - good - good to firm -firm
  
Going Away [Golf]
Steadily drawing away from the field.
  
Going Down [General]
Losing a bet or bets.
  
Going for it [Football]
When a team facing a fourth down decides to try for a new first down instead of punting; if it fails, it loses possession of the ball.
  
Going Home Hand [Poker]
A hand on which a player has wagered his last chips and will go home if he loses. Generally the player puts all his chips in the pot prior to the call from another player, or prior to the draw in draw poker or lowball, stands up, and says, "If I lose this one, I'm going home." A going home hand usually beats an Oh shit! hand.
  
Going the Overs [Poker]
1) Over blinding (Put in a blind when one is already present. In a traveling blind game, this could mean someone putting in an optional blind in addition to the mandatory blinds. In a game without mandatory blinds, this would be blinding a pot (putting in a blind) after someone else has killed it. (To put in an over blind is sometimes called to kill.). 2) Playing at a higher limit than the house has set for the game, usually for the purpose of paying time to the house at the nominal rate for the game. For example, playing 8-limit stakes in a 6-limit game, or playing 4-8 in a 3-6 game. 3) Playing, among players who agree, at higher limits then those who don't have dropped.
  
Going! [Baseball]
Called by catcher, second baseman or first baseman to alert the fielders when a runner attempts to steal.
  
Going-Away [Horse Racing]
A race animal winning a race while increasing the lead.
  
Goju Ryu [Martial Arts]
One of the 4 major karate styles. The founder of Goju Ryu was Kanryo Higaonna (1851-1915)
  
Gokyu [Archery]
A strong bow, Japan.
  
Golden Gate [Bowling]
Same as big ears.
  
Golden Glow [Poker]
A liquid for marking the backs of cards, a form of daub.
  
Golden Numbers [Roulette]
Numbers that have hit out of all proportion to their probability. Might be an indication that a wheel is biased. With additional wheel and number analysis, Golden Numbers can be relabeled as Biased-Numbers.
  
Golf [Golf]
The game. Played by playing a ball from the teeing ground into the hole by a stroke or successive strokes in accordance with the Rules of Golf.
  
Golf Glove [Golf]
A glove generally worn by a right-handed golfer on the left hand, and by a left-handed golfer on the right hand, to improve the grip.
  
Golf Style [Croquet]
Style of swing in which the mallet is swung cross the body like a putter.
  
Goliath [General]
8 selections, 247 bets - 28 doubles, 56 trebles, 70 four-timers, 56 five-timers, 28 six-timers, 8 seven-timers, 1 accumulator.
  
Golyoonies [Poker]
The nuts (The best possible hand of a given class. The "nut flush" is the highest possible flush, but might still lose to, e.g., a full house. Usually used in Hold'em games.); usually preceded by the
  
Gom [Blackjack]
The acronym for Groaner Of the Month
  
Gone [Horse Racing]
A horse which has lost all chances of winning in a race, or after racing well for part of the race, then runs out of energy and falls back in the field.
  
Gongus Wrongus [Wrestling]
A post-match assault will always continue no matter many times the ring bell is struck to indicate the match is officially over.
  
Good [Poker]
1) Not foul, that is, describing a legitimate, playable hand, one that has not run afoul of the house rules. 2) The situation in which a player has one of the various traveling blinds, dealer blind, middle blind, or big blind, someone has opened the pot, and the holder of the blind calls the opening bet, usually with a marginal hand, and with the intention of "protecting" his investment (operating under the fallacious theory that the chip or chips he has put into the pot prior to the deal in the form of the blind still belong to him).3) In lowball, smooth (The best possible low hand with a particular high card. 8432A is a smooth 8. "I've got a good eight" means the hand is probably an 8-5 or 8-4. 4) Describing a, or the, winning hand, often said by the loser of a pot with respect to the hand that has beaten him, before he has shown his own hand. Saying "That's good" essentially surrenders the pot.
  
Good (Track) [Horse Racing]
Condition between fast and slow, generally a bit wet. A dirt track that is almost fast or a turf course slightly softer than firm.
  
Good Bottom [Horse Racing]
Track that is firm under the surface, which may be sloppy or wet.
  
Good Faith [Motor Sports]
A code of conduct between parties emphasizing honesty during the transaction.
  
Good Game [Poker]
A game with players worse than you so that you can expect to win a lot of money.
  
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